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TOPIC: Women in Iceland leave work 14% early

Women in Iceland leave work 14% early 27 Oct 2016 20:44 #10719

  • alyssa.r.
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nytlive.nytimes.com/womenintheworld/2016...rk-14-percent-early/

Though Iceland is considered the world's leader in gender equity, the pay gap exists there too, but that might change. Women are leaving work 14% early to protest being paid 14% less than men (on average) for doing the same work. As soon as the clock strikes 2:38, women get up and leave their workplaces to show that they will no longer work that remaining time for free.

I think that it is a brilliant idea and a very effective way to protest. They are not only using their words, but forcing companies a taste of their own medicine (though technically, if they were to do that in equal measure, they'd be leaving work 28% early--this just makes it even). I feel that it will bring change because of how small Iceland's population is.

What do you guys think? Do you think something like this could happen in the USA?
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Women in Iceland leave work 14% early 25 Nov 2016 03:29 #11044

  • madison.s
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This is such a fascinating story and I think it's great that women are fighting for their rights. I really admire the way in which they are conducting this form of protest and think it will probably be effective. In general, people tend to lose interest in, not care about, or even not educated themselves on issues because it does not affect them but women leaving work 14% early is a brilliant idea, in my opinion. I have personally struggled with the idea of gender gap and as a woman, I find it frustrating that there is a gender gap yet I also try to understand the reasoning behind it. I think that people should be paid based on their education, experience, etc. but I don't think men or women should be paid more or less simply because of their sex. I may just be naive or not educated enough on the topic, but when I hear about paying women and men the same salary for the same job, I wonder if that means they get paid the same because of their sex or because they have the same qualifications as the men. However, another issue that I consider is whether employers use the qualifications argument to pay men more claiming they have better qualifications so finding a solution to the wage gap is an interesting topic, in my opinion. I hope that the women get their point across and employers in Iceland make a change in the workplace for the better.
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Women in Iceland leave work 14% early 27 Nov 2016 07:58 #11062

  • jiayue.s
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We should not be too ready to draw the conclusion that they are victims under sex discrimination. There is a natural tendency for women to put more emphasis on family and taking care of child, statistically. This may account for their early leave from work. The most important thing we have to ensure that is that they have free choice as to their stay or leave instead of being forced.
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Women in Iceland leave work 14% early 27 Nov 2016 21:33 #11092

  • Alexandria.T
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I heard about this on the Stuff Mom Never Told You podcast, and find that is a very good example of an equality protest. It demonstrates a direct consequence of paying a group the fraction of what another group is paid for the same work. At some point the employer would feel the effect of a reduced work force and come to make changes within their industry. Although, there are research studies that demonstrate workers can be more productive when their work hours are reduced, and employees have a better feeling of work-life balance. This protest may end up being an equalizer if production goes up and less resources are used because employees are leaving earlier in the afternoon. I'm excited to see where this goes.
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